The World’s Most Precious Stones

Precious stones, the world’s most outstanding natural treasures, are minerals that take millions of years to form and amaze with their durability and beauty. These unique treasures, which have been given many symbolic meanings throughout the history of humanity, were sometimes believed to have healing powers and were seen as a source of healing, sometimes a symbol of power and magnificence, but mostly they were shaped by skilled hands and turned into unique jewels. All precious stones, whether diamonds, rubies, sapphires, brilliants or emeralds, have their own beauty and unique characteristics.

Less than 100 of the more than 2,000 natural minerals identified today are used as precious stones, and only 16 of them have gained importance with their material and aesthetic value. These are beryl, chrysoberyl, corundum, diamond, feldspar, garnet, jade, lazurite, olivine, opal, quartz, spinel, topaz, tourmaline, turquoise and zircon. Some of these minerals allow us to obtain more than one type of gemstone, for example, emerald and aquamarine are obtained from the mineral beryl, while the mineral corundum is a source of wonderful rubies and sapphires.

Although they all have unique properties, some stones are rarer than others and are much more valuable for their size, colour and quality. Are you ready to step into the magical world of stones and get to know the 10 most precious stones in the world?

List of Most Precious Stones

Tanzanite

  • Price: $1,200 per carat

Although opal is one of the most widely available and accessible precious stones in the world, black opals are among the most desirable and most precious stones in the world, with their dark body that allows extraordinary colour plays. Found in the Lightning Ridge region of New South Wales, Australia, this gemstone is considered one of the country’s national treasures. The 306-carat black opal bearing the name “Royal One” is the most valuable opal ever produced. The most interesting feature of his story is that the miner who found the stone kept it under his pillow for 14 years until he decided to sell it. Royal One is worth just over three million dollars.

Tanzanite
Tanzanite

Black Opal

  • Price: $9,500 per carat

Although opal is one of the most widely available and accessible precious stones in the world, black opals are among the most desirable and most precious stones in the world, with their dark body that allows extraordinary colour plays. Found in the Lightning Ridge region of New South Wales, Australia, this gemstone is considered one of the country’s national treasures. The 306-carat black opal bearing the name “Royal One” is the most valuable opal ever produced. The most interesting feature of his story is that the miner who found the stone kept it under his pillow for 14 years until he decided to sell it. Royal One is worth just over three million dollars.

Black Opal
Black Opal

Beryl Red

  • Price: $10,000 per carat

Red beryl, which is one of the beryl group stones such as emerald, alexandrite and aquamarine, and also known as red emerald, red emerald, is one of the rarest stones. Although red beryl is found in certain parts of Utah, New Mexico, and northern Mexico, the most invaluable ones are mined in the Wah Wah Mountains of Utah. Red beryl, with all equally fascinating shades of crimson, is so rare that it quickly gains in value once a good specimen emerges.

Beryl Red
Beryl Red

Musgravite

  • Price: $ 35,000 per carat

The musgravite stone, first discovered in Australia in 1967, takes its name from the region where it is found. Musgravite, which has colours ranging from olive green to greyish purple, is such a rare stone that only eight gemstone quality pieces have been mined since its discovery in 2005. Although this number has increased slightly in recent years, it has been found in Sri Lanka, Antarctica, Madagascar and Tanzania, but it is still among the rare precious stones. The valuation of the stones is made by experts as an estimate.

Musgravit
Musgravit

Alexandrite

  • Price: $70,000 Per carat

The most important feature that makes Alexandrite incredibly beautiful and valuable is that it changes colour depending on light and temperature. If you have a necklace with an Alexandrite stone, it will shine with a green colour like emerald during the day, while in the evening it will turn into pink-red tones like a ruby. First found in Russia in 1833, this unique stone is also mined in Sri Lanka, Tanzania and India. The largest specimen of alexandrite ever found is on display at the Smithsonian Institution in the USA. The 65.08-carat stone is worth over four million dollars. Interestingly, Alexandrite, which is almost always smaller than one carat, increases exponentially when mined in large carats.

Alexandrite
Alexandrite

Emerald

  • Price: $305,000 per carat

Known for its exotic green tones, emerald is one of the most popular gemstones in the world. Although emeralds are found all over the world, most of the supply comes from Zambia, Zimbabwe, Brazil and Colombia. Most emeralds on the market have minor imperfections that are used to distinguish fakes from real ones. However, if a rare, flawless emerald goes on sale, it can reach mind-blowing prices. The most valuable emerald known is the Rockefeller Emerald, which was bought by John D. Rockefeller for his wife and offered for sale by their sons after the death of the couple. It is known that the emerald, which was sold at Christie’s for 305 thousand dollars per carat and 5.5 million dollars in total, was previously part of the Russian Empire collection.

Emerald
Emerald

Ruby

  • Price: Per Carat 1.18 Million Dollars

With colours ranging from pink to deep red and even burgundy, rubies are considered a symbol of passion and energy. Its most important features are its magnificent colours and durability. Since ruby ​​is the hardest gemstone after diamond, it is especially preferred in jewellery designs that require superior and detailed craftsmanship. Rubies are mined in many parts of the world, the most valuable being in Myanmar. The world’s most valuable ruby ​​is the “Sunrise Ruby”, a 26-carat Myanmar ruby ​​that was auctioned for $30 million. Yakut takes its name from a poem written by Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi. Here are some lines of the poem:

  • “The lover says, there is nothing left of me.
  • I am like a ruby ​​lifted and held to the rising sun.
  • Is it a stone or is the earth made of red?”
Ruby
Ruby

Pink Diamond

  • Price: Per Carat $1.19 Million

Pink diamonds have a very special place among the extremely rare and therefore very valuable coloured diamonds. Representing less than 0.1% of the world’s diamond production, these very elegant and pink coloured stones originate from the Argyle Mine in Australia. The value of pink diamonds is expected to increase even more as the mine ceased production in recent years. The pink diamond, named “Pink Star” and evaluated as “perfect” by the Gemology Institute of America, is the most expensive jewel in the world, with a price of 71.2 million dollars. The Pink Star, which weighs 59.60 carats, was sold at the Hong Kong Sotheby’s auction in 2017.

Pink Diamond
Pink Diamond

Jadeite

  • Price: Per Carat $3 Million

Although jade is in the category of semi-precious stones, the family’s most special high-quality stone, called jadeite, has a completely different position with its million-dollar carat value. Contrary to popular belief, jadeite is not just green; It has many colours including white, black, lavender, red and yellow. There are even colourless ones. But the most preferred and most valuable is “Imperial Jade,” known for its vibrant green hue and high translucency. Although Myanmar is the source of more than 90 per cent of the world’s jadeite, the best jade processing masters are grown in China. There is also a jadeite necklace among the most expensive jewels in the world. The necklace named “Hutton Mdivani”, owned by Barbara Hutton and consisting of 27 top-quality jadeite beads, was sold for exactly $27.44 million in 2014.

Jadeite
Jadeite

Blue Diamond

  • Price: Per Carat $3.93 Million

Of all coloured diamonds, blue diamonds are considered one of the rarest and most valuable types. Blue diamonds, like all other diamonds, are carbon elements fused under intense heat and pressure over millions of years. The boron element gives the blue diamond its distinctive colour, while the nitrogen it contains determines the intensity of the blue colour. The larger the blue diamond, which is mined from a small number of mines in South Africa, Australia and India, the higher its value. The most famous blue diamond known as the Hope Diamond has become legendary with the stories of its owners over the years. The 112-carat diamond is thought to have been stolen from a Buddhist temple in India, with the first records of it dating back to the 17th century.

The World's Most Precious Stones

Its first owner was the French merchant Jean Baptiste Tavernier. The journey of the diamond XIV in 1668. It gains a different dimension when it is sold to Louis. During this period, it is reworked to 67 carats. The diamond, which was stolen and not traced for a long time, later appears in England. Although it is thought to bring bad luck to its owners, it changes hands many times. Among those who included the Hope Diamond in their collection, Sultan II. Abdülhamid and the famous jewellery designer Pierre Cartier.

The stone, which fell to 45.42 carats over the years and was recently purchased by a New York jeweller, Harry Winston, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, where it was donated today. Abdülhamid and the famous jewellery designer Pierre Cartier.

The stone, which fell to 45.42 carats over the years and was recently purchased by a New York jeweller, Harry Winston, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, where it was donated today. Abdülhamid and the famous jewellery designer Pierre Cartier. The stone, which fell to 45.42 carats over the years and was recently purchased by a New York jeweller, Harry Winston, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, where it was donated today.

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